NOLA Firearm Confiscation?

Discussion in 'Gun Laws and Politics' started by GearZ, Feb 23, 2014.

  1. GearZ

    GearZ Decent Shooter

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    Hello all. As many may know, privately owned firearms were confiscated in the wake of Hurricane Katrina back in 2005. That sparked serious outcry about individual rights, particularly during an emergency when private citizens were pretty much on their own. The State of Louisiana past a bill to prevent it, as did congress at the federal level and then President Bush signed it into law.

    My question is this: on what legal grounds did they justify the wholesale confiscation of private property and, for the matter, property protected by the Second Amendment.? Anyone have some insight on this one?

    Thanks all.
  2. Slacktrack

    Slacktrack Moderator Staff Member

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    We had the same problem in Canada last summer in Alberta. Police seized "improperly stored" firearms for what they called "public safety". Thinking about it from the police side of things, you have abandoned dwellings that are at risk of being looted. Seizing firearms prevents looters from getting them. I can see the logic and have no serious issues with it as long as the public is informed, the process is transparent and everyone gets their property back. It definitely should not take priority over helping the people in need though. Just my 2 Canadian cents.
  3. GearZ

    GearZ Decent Shooter

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    I remember reading about the incident in Alberta. It seems to have caused quite a stir.

    The incident in NOLA, however, wasn't confined to just abandoned buildings, but private citizens that had armed themselves against looters.
  4. Slacktrack

    Slacktrack Moderator Staff Member

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    That's a completely different pickle. If the owner is actually there, then the cops shouldn't touch the firearms.

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